The oil in cannabis oil pens can range from cheap distillate to fancy rosin

Despite what some may think, there’s a huge difference in quality from cheap mass-produced beer and fancy craft beer.

This isn’t true with every example across the board, but it’s consistent with some of the highest rated possibilities on the market.

The degree of flavor in a quality craft beer is impossible to understand if you haven’t tried it yourself. There is no combination of words that can supply a person that first-hand experience otherwise. My dad had been buying cheap Canadian beer since the 1977s and was shocked by the flavor profiles of the craft beers I had him try when I visited him. If you’ve only ever bought cannabis oil pens with cheap distillate inside, your mind will be blown once you try a vaporizer cartridge filled with fancy live rosin. Distillate oil is often THC and botanical terpenes added to “simulate” the terpene profile of an existing strain love Blue Dream or OG Kush. However, the oil could be from any batch of flower and is often trim or left-over shake. Botanical terpenes are not going to supply you the same flavor and entourage effect that you get when you deal with a full spectrum product love live rosin. With rosin, you either take cannabis flower buds or dry sift hashish and you press it between two heat-controlled hydraulic plates. Bags with weird mesh densities are used to retain the plant matter so the oils can be released and will fully melt when heated, compared to traditional hashish. Depending on the pressure, temperature, and the time you hold the plates together will determine the color, texture, and viscosity of the final product. You can purposefully make runny rosin that is easier to put inside a vaporizer cartridge opposed to drier rosin that would otherwise get dabbed in a concentrate dabbing rig.

 

 

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